Heather Fisher Recovery Services

Mental Health

What is Mental Illness?

Mental Illness is nothing to be ashamed of. It is a medical condition just like anything else you might see a doctor for. All too often those struggling with a mental health condition feel shame and unrealistic pressure to be “normal and en u suffering in silence. Nearly 1 in 5 adults in the US are struggling with mental illness and everybody deserves comfort, safety, and relief in getting help.

Mental illnesses are health conditions causing changes in emotion, thinking behavior, or a combination of these. Mental illness can affect an individual’s ability to complete daily tasks and maintain functioning, engage in relationships, and function in career and school. Mental illnesses are treatable and the majority of those who receive treatment are able to live full and healthy lives.

What is Mental Health?

Mental Health includes psychological, emotional, and social wellbeing. It affects how we think about ourselves and others, contributes to our emotions, and affects our actions. It also determines how we function in relationships, manage stress. There are many factors that contribute to experiencing mental health problems. These include:

    • Genetics and/ or brain chemistry
    • Experiences and environment such as trauma, abuse, unhealthy relationships, or poor living conditions
    • Family history of mental health problems or growing up with a caretaker or parent with mental illness

There are a variety of common types of mental illness, all with different characteristics, attributes and stemming from different causes.

Anxiety Disorders

What are Anxiety Disorders?

The symptoms commonly seen in all diagnosed anxiety disorders include high levels of anxiety that interfere with daily activities, overreaction to emotions, and lack of control in response to stressful situations. Below are the 7 main types of anxiety disorders.

Characterized by feelings of extreme and unrealistic worry and tension even when there is nothing present to trigger those emotions. Worry and rapid thoughts occur often negatively affecting daily functioning and activities related to health, work school and relationships.

Panic disorders are characterized by episodes of overwhelming and uncontrollable feelings of terror (panic attacks). Physical symptoms often appear during an episode such as hyperventilation, increased heart rate, dizziness, perspiration, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, or a feeling of choking.

Individuals experience this type of anxiety disorder after experiencing a traumatic event including but not limited to: natural disaster, domestic violence, childhood neglect and abuse, sexal assault, violent crime or military combat.

Characterized by an unreasonable or heightened fear of interacting with others and being in social situations. People with social anxiety experience fears of appearing in crowded places, participating in social activities and public speaking.

Demonstrated by a debilitating fear of a particular object, situation, animals or people. Some of the most common phobias include fear of enclosed spaces (claustrophobia), fear of heights (aviophobia), and fear of people (agoraphobia).

Appears in those who have had traumatic experiences with abandonment or trauma. Symptoms include feeling intense fear and nervousness when a person you are close with leaves your sight and always worrying that something bad is going to happen to the people that you love.

The persistent misuse of substances including drugs and alcohol and other medications can trigger symptoms of an anxiety disorder.

What is Depression?

Depression is a mental health disorder characterized by persistently low moods and loss of interest that causes significant impairment in daily functioning abilities. Those diagnosed with major depression report the most prominent symptom being profound sadness and a sense of despair that interferes with daily activities and functioning. Some common symptoms include:

  • Depressed or irritable moods
  • Loss of pleasure and interest
  • Fatigue and loss of energy
  • Indecisiveness and poor concentration
  • Feelings of hopelessness

What is Depression?

Depression is a mental health disorder characterized by persistently low moods and loss of interest that causes significant impairment in daily functioning abilities. Those diagnosed with major depression report the most prominent symptom being profound sadness and a sense of despair that interferes with daily activities and functioning. Some common symptoms include:

  • Depressed or irritable moods
  • Loss of pleasure and interest
  • Fatigue and loss of energy
  • Indecisiveness and poor concentration
  • Feelings of hopelessness

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

BPD is characterized by having extreme difficulty with emotional regulation. People with borderline personality disorder experience intense emotions for extended periods of time and struggle with bringing themselves back to a place of baseline stability after emotionally triggering events. Symptoms can include:

  • Unstable relationships that alternate between idealization and devaluation
  • Impulsive behaviors that can result in dangerous outcomes
  • An unstable self-image affects values, goals, moods, and opinions
    Periods of depression, anxiety, ad irritability normally lasting up to a few days at a time

Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression). Bipolar Disorder (BD) causes the individual to feel unusual shifts in mood, energy, concentration, activity levels, and the ability to maintain success in sustaining daily functioning.

Getting Help for a Mental Health Diagnosis

If left untreated, the symptoms of a mental health diagnosis can be extremely debilitating. With ongoing symptoms sometimes it’s hard to realize that you are not your diagnosis and that there is healing available to you. As family and friends of someone who is suffering from a mental health condition, it is normal to feel helpless in your efforts to get your loved one to change or try to do something differently. With compassion and love, there are many ways to support your loved ones in getting the help they need to be living a full and productive life unbound by the changes of their diagnosis. There are many options for the treatment of mental illness in both an inpatient and outpatient setting. We understand that the process of seeking treatment can be frustrating and confusing at times. That’s when utilizing an interventionist can come in handy. Whether you are trying to stage an intervention to extend the option of treatment, or need help finding the right placement, Heather Fisher Recovery can help you.

How can Heather Fisher Recovery Services Help?

I thoroughly vet all facilities before I refer them. Making the best match between client and treatment facility is the key to a successful outcome, that’s why a large part of my time is spent touring facilities and interviewing staff before I will recommend them to a family. Based on pre-screening, presenting symptoms, provided insurance and geographical location, I will research and recommend three JCAHO or CARF accredited treatment programs to provide care for and treat you or your loved one at the appropriate level of care needed. I am not in contract nor do I receive benefits, kickbacks or compensations from any treatment facilities for referring them. That’s illegal, unethical and I would risk my licensing in doing so. Very simply put, if I wouldn’t recommend it for my loved one, I won’t recommend it for your loved one.